Tomato Bread, page 346, June 29, 2017

I have always been a tomato fan, and ate them like apples when I was little.  This recipe looks intriguing and thought it would be a nice summer-time loaf.   My mouth is already watering thinking of cheese or bacon and avocado sandwiches, or even croutons made using this bread.

This is a loaf that can be made using the machine’s delay timer, but I am opting to make it using the basic program.  I am also making a couple changes to the recipe, because it calls for a small amount of whole wheat flour which I don’t eat, and the oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes I have on hand contain garlic and herbs.  (I think the garlic and herbs will only add to the loaf, so I am unworried about that change.  I know that whole wheat flour is slightly lower in protein than bread flour, so I hope that substitution in this small an amount won’t negatively affect the finished product.  In the recipe below, I will list what I put in the pan, with the actual recipe ingredients in parentheses.

I put the ingredients into my bread machine in the following order:

3 tablespoons imported Italian tomato paste (the cookbook states that you can use standard canned tomato paste if the Italian is unavailable, but that the Italian can sometimes be found “stashed at the deli counter.” I found mine online.)

854693000102-mutti-double-concentrated-tomato-paste-in-tube.jpg1/2 cup chopped oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, with their oil (Here is where I used tomatoes with garlic and herbs.  I also realized, as I am typing this, that the recipe calls for 1/3 cueae59e68-092c-4053-8558-7f435da98265_1.cebd291101106a824433ed896ace135e.jpegp, not 1/2 cup.  Hmmm, I really need to get my act together here.)

 

1 1/4 cups water

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

3 1/4 cups bread flour (Here, the recipe calls for 2 3/4 cups bread flour and 1/2 cup whole wheat flour)

1 1/2 tablespoons gluten

2 teaspoons SAF yeast.

I then set my crust on medium and started the “Basic” cycle on my bread machine.

Well then, I just snuck a peek at the dough and it is a lovely red color and smells like tomato soup.  Let’s just hope my changes (and accidents) don’t cause any problems.

IMG_7526[1041].jpg

As you can see from the photo, this loaf is intensely red.  The tomato flavor is just as intense as the color (good if, like me, you love tomatoes.)  I do wonder if it would have been a little milder had I got the amount for the sun-dried tomatoes correct. The bread is moist and delicious with a crunchy crust and bright bites of sun-dried tomato throughout.

Just a note, and I know this will seem trivial based on the fact that I got the measurement wrong anyway, but the “with their oil” direction regarding those tomatoes drove me a little nuts.  How much oil from the jar was I supposed to include?  Did this just mean I was supposed to NOT rinse the tomatoes, but forgo  purposefully including the oil from the jar?  Should I have made sure to get a lot of oil?  I spooned tomatoes and oil into my measuring cup, but was unsure if I had the proportions correct.  As with most bread I bake, as long as it tastes good, which this does, I am calling it a win.

Advertisements

Semolina Country Bread, page 202, June 15-16, 2107

Yes, I am finally back at it.  I know I have dropped the ball on this project, but I am back now.  Thanks to anyone still around.

My parents, my Aunt Kathy and Uncle John are coming to town tomorrow and (according to Mom) Aunt Kathy requested a loaf of bread.  I found this loaf in the cookbook and it can use the delay timer, so I am putting the ingredients in the machine tonight and setting my delay timer to be ready tomorrow morning.  They will be here in the late afternoon. This is definitely a test case, as I haven’t been baking in a while and I’m unsure about the freshness of my ingredients.  Everything opened has been stored in the refrigerator, so I am hoping for the best.

This loaf is supposed to be fantastic served with garlic butter and makes great bruschetta.

Ingredients for this two-pound loaf went into the bread machine pan in the following order:

1 3/4 cups water

3 Tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons salt

2 1/4 cups bread flour

1 3/4 cups semolina flour (be sure to use the finely ground semolina flour that is used to make pasta rather than the coarser grind that is similar to farina.

2 Tablespoons sesame seeds

1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon gluten

2 1/4 teaspoons SAF yeast

I set the crust for dark and the program for French bread with a 8 hour delayed start on the timer.  Now to bed and I will complete this post in the morning.

image[960]

Dang, it cratered.  I am not terribly surprised though,  In addition to not having baked in a while, I did note liquid seeping up through the flour in the bread machine after I set the delay timer.  If the water, oil and salt came into contact with the yeast too soon, it could have caused this result.  If the yeast is activated too soon, the loaf can  rise and then collapse before baking time.

I made baked potato soup for dinner and we served the bread, sliced and buttered with the soup.  Crater notwithstanding, the bread was delicious.  The semolina flour added a pleasant chewiness and there was just a hint of sesame seed flavor.  As you can see from the photo, the crust is a deep golden brown.  The crust was crispy and a little difficult to cut through at the corners ( we didn’t have a bread knife).

I am glad to be back up and working on this blog, and I am pleased with the flavors in this loaf.  Everyone enjoyed it and several people had seconds.