Granola Breakfast Bread, page 544, October 14, 2017

I was visiting my parents’ house for my mom’s birthday and decided to bake this quick bread for them using Mom’s bread machine.  Her machine has a quick-bread setting, where mine does not.  I do want to clarify that this is a quick-bread (no yeast), so you want to use a “Quick Bread” setting and not an “Express” setting.  (Express settings on a bread machine are for a faster yeast bread.

The ingredients were added to the bread machine pan in the following order:

3/4 cup milk

1/4 cup plain yogurt (I used plain Greek yogurt)

1/2 cup vegetable or nut oil (I used hazelnut oil)

2 large eggs

Grated zest of 1 lemon (I used 1 teaspoon dried lemon zest)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3/4 cup sugar

1 cup whole wheat pastry flour (see note after next ingredient)

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour (I used 2 cups of unbleached all-purpose flour and left out the whole wheat pastry flour altogether)

3/4 cup granola (I used Partner’s brand Apples and Cinnamon Granola)

1/2 cup chopped dried pineapple of golden raisins (I used the golden raisins)

1 Tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon or apple pie spice (I used cinnamon)

1/2 teaspoon salt

 

After the ingredients were in the pan, I set the machine on the quick bread cycle and pressed “start”.  Mom’s machine does not allow for a crust setting on this cycle, but the cookbook recommends using the dark setting, if you have the option.  After 5 minutes of the mixing cycle, I used a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides of the pan to ensure complete combination of the ingredients. The batter was thick and lumpy.

At the end of the baking cycle, the bread was not completely baked through, which is not unusual for quick breads done in the machine.  Using the “bake only” cycle, I  allowed the bread another 35 minutes to finish.  At the end of the extended bake time, a skewer inserted in the center of the loaf came out clean.

I immediately removed the pan from the machine and allowed the bread to stand in the pan for 10 minutes.  I then turned the bread from the pan, onto a wire rack, to finish cooling completely.  The cookbook says that an optional step at this point is to brush the top with some melted butter.  I skipped this step.  The bread, once fully cooled, was wrapped in plastic wrap.  This loaf can be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator.

IMG_8704[1816]

Dad tried a slice of this bread with just a little butter and enjoyed it.  It was moist and the smell was lovely.

Mom tried a slice toasted, she says it was “Delish” and that she would  like to have me make it again.

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Welsh Bara Brith and Pumpkin Apple Butter, Goodbye Downton Abbey

My sister and I decided to get together for a little tea party and viewing of the series finale of Downton Abbey. (I will miss that show.) I thought this would be a good opportunity to use my mom’s bread machine to make a quick bread, and a spread.  (Her machine has both of those settings.)

The Welsh Bara Brith is very similar to what we in America think of as a fruitcake, however, the dried fruit is soaked in Earl Grey Tea instead of liquor.    I deviated from the recipe a bit, I will mark deviations with parentheses.

The night before I was going to make the bread, I boiled 1 1/4 cups of water and poured that into a 4 cup glass measuring cup.  To the water, I added 2 Earl Grey tea bags and let that steep for 10 minutes.  I then removed the tea bags, squeezing them to release all the tea.  To the tea, I added 4 oz of chopped dried apricots, 2 oz of dried cranberries and 2 oz of chopped dried figs.  I allowed that to come to room temperature, and then put it in the refrigerator overnight. (The recipe called for 8 oz of chopped dried fruit, so I used what I had on hand. The recipe also says to let the fruit soak for 1 to 4 hours.)

In the morning, I added the following to the bread machine pan:

The tea-soaked fruit, with liquid

1 large egg

1/2 cup milk

1 tablespoon of unsalted butter, melted (the recipe says that the butter can be melted, or at room temperature)

3 tablespoons of apricot preserves (The recipe calls for your choice of apricot preserves, orange marmalade or ginger marmalade)

1 cup light brown sugar

2 3/4 cups unbleached all purpose flour

1 cup dark raisins (recipe says dark or golden)

1/2 cup candied cherries (Here was a big deviation, the recipe said candied orange peel, I used what I had on hand)

2 3/4 teaspoons baking powder

2 teaspoons apple pie spice

3/4 teaspoon salt

The recipe says to used the Quick Bread/Cake cycle on the machine and then, when the timer goes off, use the bake only cycle for another 20 minutes, or until the top is firm to the touch, it shrinks slightly from the sides of the pan, and a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  (20 extra minutes was no where near long enough,  I kept adding time, in 20 minute increments until the loaf was done.  All total, I think I may have added another hour or more.)

Once the loaf was done, I removed it, still in the pan, to a rack to cook for 1o minutes.  After that, I removed it, right side up, to the rack to cool completely, then I sliced it and stored the slices in the refrigerator until teatime.

After cleaning the pan, I started my Pumpkin Apple Butter. According to the cookbook, this recipe is adapted for the bread machine from a Libby’s recipe.

Into the bread machine pan, I placed:

15 oz of pumpkin puree

1 large Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and grated

1/2 cup unsweetened, unfiltered apple juice

1/2 cup light brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

I set the machine for the Jam cycle and let it go.  When the cycle completed, I removed the pan and stirred in 3 tablespoons of unsalted butter.  I waited until the mixture was cool before transferring it to small containers to freeze.  You can also store this in the refrigerator for up to 2 months.

The bread was dense, moist, and totally delicious.  Not being a fan of fruitcake, I was a little worried that I would not like this, but the tea made all the difference.

Welsh Bara Brith

The pumpkin apple butter was great also, but not really needed with the bread.  It was better with plain English Muffins or over biscuits.  The cookbook recommends serving the bread spread with butter, and I think that may be the best way to appreciate all the great flavors in it.  Since I can’t eat a lot of dried fruit, I sent the leftovers with Becky and she took them to work to get more opinions.  I also gave her the leftover Apricot Preserves, so she offered that with it as well.

Here is what our taste testers at Steamboat Animal Hospital had to say,

“Favorite so far”

“Iz Goood!”

“I love the tea soaked fruit.You can really taste the tea.  I tried it w/marmalade and without. . . both ways are delicious. I love the consistency of the bread and the mix of flavors are each distinct, but go together very well. Two thumbs up.”

“So Good!  Would have never thought of soaking the fruit in tea for baking – genius!  How can I get my hands on a whole loaf?”

“Dank”  (I totally had to use the urban dictionary online to define that one. . . an expression frequently used by stoners and hippies for something of high quality.) LOL

All in all, this one is a keeper, and will possibly show up again around the holidays.

Not sure if this would be good enough to serve the Grantham Family upstairs, but I am sure the staff downstairs would approve.  (Well, maybe not Mr. Carson.)

Carrot Bread, page 558, August 2015

This is the first “no-yeast quick bread” I have made out of this cookbook.  My bread machine at home doesn’t have a quick bread cycle, but mom’s does, so I decided to try a loaf while I was at her house.  We had gone to the store and I found some organic rainbow carrots (orange, yellow, white and purple.)  This recipe came to mind, so I picked them up.  The recipe describes this quick bread as cake-like and that it resembles a steamed pudding.

The ingredients went into the bread machine pan in the following order:  4 large eggs, 1/2 cup walnut oil, 1/2 cup vegetable oil, 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, 2 cups lightly packed shredded raw carrots, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups bread flour, 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda, 2 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon and 1 teaspoon salt.  I started the quick bread cycle and let it go.

The recipe states that when the machine beeps at the end of the cycle, I needed to press stop and program the bake only cycle for another 15 minutes to finish baking.  The bread is supposed to be done when it shrinks slightly from the sides of the pan, the sides are dark brown and the top is firm when touched with a finger.  I really overthought this one.  I started with 10 minutes.  It still looked too damp, so I added another 5.  Then another 10, then ANOTHER 15.  I finally threw up my hands and declared the loaf a lost cause, swearing that I had wasted my time and ingredients (including those lovely carrots.)  Wise women, my mom and cousin, Michelle, encouraged me to have us each try a little before I tossed it out.

Thank goodness they did.  I somehow expected this to look and act like a loaf of yeast bread, forgetting that the author had already described it as akin to a steamed pudding.  It was fantastic.  We didn’t eat it in slices, rather in small dessert dishes with spoons.  It was like a warm carrot cake.  So tasty.  Thank you ladies for helping me rein in a totally needless panic attack.  Definitely a keeper.