Semolina Country Bread, page 202, June 15-16, 2107

Yes, I am finally back at it.  I know I have dropped the ball on this project, but I am back now.  Thanks to anyone still around.

My parents, my Aunt Kathy and Uncle John are coming to town tomorrow and (according to Mom) Aunt Kathy requested a loaf of bread.  I found this loaf in the cookbook and it can use the delay timer, so I am putting the ingredients in the machine tonight and setting my delay timer to be ready tomorrow morning.  They will be here in the late afternoon. This is definitely a test case, as I haven’t been baking in a while and I’m unsure about the freshness of my ingredients.  Everything opened has been stored in the refrigerator, so I am hoping for the best.

This loaf is supposed to be fantastic served with garlic butter and makes great bruschetta.

Ingredients for this two-pound loaf went into the bread machine pan in the following order:

1 3/4 cups water

3 Tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons salt

2 1/4 cups bread flour

1 3/4 cups semolina flour (be sure to use the finely ground semolina flour that is used to make pasta rather than the coarser grind that is similar to farina.

2 Tablespoons sesame seeds

1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon gluten

2 1/4 teaspoons SAF yeast

I set the crust for dark and the program for French bread with a 8 hour delayed start on the timer.  Now to bed and I will complete this post in the morning.

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Dang, it cratered.  I am not terribly surprised though,  In addition to not having baked in a while, I did note liquid seeping up through the flour in the bread machine after I set the delay timer.  If the water, oil and salt came into contact with the yeast too soon, it could have caused this result.  If the yeast is activated too soon, the loaf can  rise and then collapse before baking time.

I made baked potato soup for dinner and we served the bread, sliced and buttered with the soup.  Crater notwithstanding, the bread was delicious.  The semolina flour added a pleasant chewiness and there was just a hint of sesame seed flavor.  As you can see from the photo, the crust is a deep golden brown.  The crust was crispy and a little difficult to cut through at the corners ( we didn’t have a bread knife).

I am glad to be back up and working on this blog, and I am pleased with the flavors in this loaf.  Everyone enjoyed it and several people had seconds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greek Bread, page 55, February 22, 2016

I’ve been on a bread-baking hiatus for the past several months, so I am coming back with what sounds like a simple, tasty bread from the “Daily Breads” chapter of Ms. Hensperger’s book.  The dairy element in this recipe is evaporated goat’s milk.  It is mentioned that evaporated cow’s milk can be substituted, but that this is more “authentically” Greek.  The author also warns against substituting regular milk for evaporated because you will miss out on the sweetness.  This recipe uses a little bit of whole wheat flour, but I doubt it is enough to cause me difficulties, so I will be keeping this one for myself.

First into the bread machine pan goes 1 cup of evaporated goat’s milk.  (This didn’t use the whole can, so anyone out there how a suggestion for using a small amount of EGM, I am all ears.)  Next comes 1/3 cup water, and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt.  Flour for this loaf is 2 1/2 cups of bread flour and 1/4 cup whole wheat flour.  (According to the recipe, you can substitute 1/4 cup whole grain spelt flour for the whole wheat flour.) Then I add 1 1/4 tablespoons of sesame seeds, 1 tablespoon of gluten, 2 teaspoons sugar and 2 teaspoons SAF yeast.  This loaf uses the “Basic” and “Medium” settings on my machine.

I forgot how great baking makes my house smell; this loaf is rising beautifully and shows no signs of the dreaded “crater loaf.”

My plan for dinner tonight is homemade chicken noodle soup, and I think this bread ought to be great served alongside it.

The machine finished its cycle and I put the bread on a rack to cool while making my soup. It is a really pretty loaf of bread. It has perfect air pockets and the taste reminds me a little of a sourdough, owing to the goat’s milk, I’m sure.



All in all, a very tasty bread to restart my baking.

The soup’s pretty good, too. I used a recipe titled “The Ultimate Chicken Noodle Soup” by Gina Nistico from the February/March 2016 issue of Taste of Home Magazine.  It makes a huge pot of soup, so my freezer will be full for a good long while.